Strategy for Open Workout 13.1

So from video analysis and some trial runs, here is what we figured out:

Note: most of the following advice is designed to get 190 reps in this workout, which in my view will be amongst the best in the world.

1. GO SLOW ON THE BURPEES
This is likely the key to the entire workout. Going out too fast, even slightly, will kill the rest of the workout, particularly when you approach the 3rd bar (165/100#).

What is slow? 15-17 burpees per minute. This translates into about 1 burpee every 3-4 seconds. You will be surprised how slow this feels when you are fresh (the first set of 40) and how difficult this pace is in the subsequent sets. But it is imperative that you keep this pace for as long as possible.

Probably the best way to practice this is to download a metronome to your iPad or iPhone and set it to somewhere between 60-68 beats per minute with a 4 count beat per measure. Essentially, you want to touch the bar every 4th beep.

2. DROP THE BAR FOR ALL SETS FROM 135/75# ON
This is where most of your competition will do the dumb jock thing and string together reps. 135 and 75# is light for most of you so you will be tempted to hold onto the bar. DO NOT DO THIS. You are doing twice as much work as needed. In workouts with fewer reps, this might be a good strategy, but this workout is much too long to hold on to the bar.

What we’ve seen is that the time cost of holding onto the bar (due to fatigue) for as little as 3 reps @ 135/75# and holding on at all @ 165/100# is greater than the time cost of dropping the bar every rep. Said another way, the athlete who holds on to the bar must subsequently rest longer before he/she readdresses the bar. And as I said before, in shorter workouts (Grace), holding onto the bar sometimes makes sense. NOT HERE. In this workout, the time saved by holding on to the bar is actually eliminated and added to because the athlete takes longer to recover to readdress the bar. You’re actually losing time by doing this.

Note: If you are going to employ this strategy, you must remain close to your bar. Do not back away from it to rest or do the dance we all do in approaching the bar. You must remain close to the bar because as soon as it settles you must be ready to perform the next rep (see first video below).

Additionally, by holding on to the bar particularly at the 135/75#, you fatigue yourself for the remainder of the workout. Don’t be a dumb jock.

ONE CAVEAT: Because the 75# bar is so light, it may jump all over the place for women. If you can not get the proper bumpers that bounce very little (think Rogue competition or HG plates) then if you are really strong (a snatch above 145#), string these together in sets of 2-3. BUT singles is the goal.

3. PACE THE SNATCHES
A. 75/45# break these up into 3sets. In any combination you want. Get through them in less than 60 to 75 seconds.
B. 135/75# perform a rep every 6 seconds. 10 per minute. Complete in about 2.5 to 3 minutes.
C. 165/100# perform a rep every 9 seconds. About 6 to 7 per minute. Complete in less than 4.5 minutes.

4. KEEP PLATE CHANGES TO LESS THAN 30 SECONDS
Practice this.

5. SET UP A PROPER BURPEE STATION
What we’ve found is that a pullup bar works best. However, you should not approach the bar as if you were going to do a pullup. Turn 90 degrees, stand under the bar, and simply reach up. You will not have to look up every rep and this will save you in fatigue cost.

6. IF YOU GET TO THE LAST BARIf you get to the last bar, chances are you will be top 30 in the world. Have in your mind that you will make ONE attempt and that one MUST count. If you are successful at lifting this bar, approach the next rep with the same mindset.

7. IF YOU CAN NOT KEEP THIS PACE
Keep this pace as long as possible. Even if you do not get to the last bar, holding this pace for as long as possible will get you as deep into the rounds as is within your ability. Do NOT game the tiebreaker. Can’t be done.

8. WATCH THESE TWO VIDEOS

Do this… http://vimeo.com/37782138

NOT this… http://youtu.be/aRQAqdBF5GU

Good luck.
Ben

Print Friendly
This entry was posted in Programming, Words. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>